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Concluding An Essay Without Saying In Conclusion Crossword

SUNDAY PUZZLE Hi there. No, you’re not insane. I’ll explain what just happened to you, but first, take the time to read the title of the puzzle.

Sundays are the only day of the week that The New York Times crossword runs with a title and I believe that it’s a gift. The title is a good hint at what the puzzle will be about without spoiling anything. Some solvers might not want a hint, but if you’re stuck in the middle of a solve, there’s nothing wrong with grabbing a lifeline. And in today’s puzzle by Natan Last, you might want that lifeline.

I say this because, in addition to the EAR rebus element (for beginning solvers, that means that the letters EAR are all squeezed into one square instead of writing one letter into each square), you will need to “Jump to Conclusions” to make sense of the theme entries. Let’s take a closer look at them.

First, the rebus and how to enter it. Mr. Last has placed a total of six EARs (or three pairs of EARs) in the grid, and you can find them in the six theme entries. Luckily for solvers, the difficulty of determining where they go has been eased considerably by Mr. Last and Will Shortz by putting circles in the grid. You can enter the rebus by either hitting your Escape key or the “Rebus” key in the web game and app. That will open up a larger square in which you can type multiple letters. Then hit “Enter” to close the square. Nifty, right?

So we have our EARs, but why are the theme entries gibberish?, I hear you asking. They’re actually not gibberish, and therein lies the beauty of this puzzle. Mr. Last has wrapped his theme inside a two part revealer at 23- and 113 Across, which reads IN ONE EAR AND / OUT THE OTHER. So you are being asked to “go in” or start with one theme entry and exit “out” the other matching entry after the EAR rebus.

For example, at 31 Across, you might have written in WHER[EAR]IGHTTOKNOW, which doesn’t make much sense on the face of it. Now look at what you have at 46 Across: IHAV[EAR]EMYKEYS. At 31 Across, you have the clue “Common query from one about to leave the house” and the answer is WHERE ARE MY KEYS? In order to read that, you would go into the entry at 31 Across, WHER[E AR] and then continue reading out the EAR at 46 Across, which would be E MY KEYS. And it works the other way, too. If you go in at 46 Across, I HAV[E A R], and go out at 31 Across, IGHT TO KNOW, you wind up with the answer to the clue “Indignant reply when someone withholds information,” which is I HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW.

IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE OTHER. Get it?

Now go do that two more times, for the theme entries at 55- and 77 Across, as well as for 86- and 100 Across, and then give yourself a hearty pat on the back for getting that.

In nontheme news, I absolutely loved seeing the debut of Andy Samberg and T-Pain’s “I’M ON A BOAT.” It doesn’t even come close to meeting standards for profane language, so I’ll just say that if you find it on your travels around the web, give it a watch because it’s hilarious. I also liked seeing the feminist bent and presence of WAGE GAP in the puzzle, although I really wish it didn’t have to be a thing. I can appreciate the amount of ALONE TIME I have, now that my kids are getting older. I also liked YOU’LL COME AROUND, WASN’T ME, CRY ME A RIVER, HEY YA, my alma mater’s updating of their nickname (formerly the Orangemen and Orangewomen) to the Syracuse ORANGE and oh, the aspirational goal of having INBOX ZERO, which will never happen for me.

I felt that this was one of those truly great Sunday puzzles that doesn’t feel like a lot of work after you get the theme. Not only did the theme keep me guessing, but the fill felt fresh and mostly top-shelf. Nice work, Mr. Last.

Let’s give you a target — sorry, I mean let’s hear from our constructor:

Constructor’s Notes:

Literalizing the phrase “In one ear and out the other” is an idea I’d sat on for a while, toying with different ways to make the theme as big as possible. At one point I think I stared at a Sunday-sized grid with left-right symmetry and black squares in a shape meant to evoke ears. It wasn’t cute. I’m happy I was able to find enough phrases to make every theme answer something spoken, and so something that actually goes in one ear and out the other.

I have no idea how hard this puzzle will play to regular Sunday solvers — I always like tricks like this, but the initial feedback from Will and Joel was that this puzzle was in fact too hard. After some back and forth we decided circling the rebus squares was both enough of a hint to solvers, and one that didn’t compromise the fun of the theme.

Hopefully some of the more modern fill is a welcome addition for most solvers. I’M ON A BOAT — aren’t we all — was one of those answers you see can fit and work way too hard to keep. And RUBIO for some reason wasn’t in my word list, but he responsibly bailed me out of that SW corner with true robotic aplomb and a promise that, in his America, I could keep all the earnings from my burgeoning TIRE SWING business. A real leader.

Hope you enjoyed the puzzle!

We now move on, in case your brain wasn’t already exhausted enough, with the totally intellectual Harvard University Class Day speech from 2004:

Your thoughts?

It can sometimes be difficult to start a sentence to express ideas, or find words to show the relationship between ideas. Below is a list of possible sentence starters, transitional and other words that may be useful.

To introduce

This essay discusses …

… is explored …

… is defined …

The definition of … will be given

… is briefly outlined …

… is explored …

The issue focused on ….

… is demonstrated ...

… is included …

In this essay …..

… is explained …

… are identified …

The key aspect discussed …

… are presented …

… is justified …

Views on …. range from ….

… is evaluated …

… is examined …

The central theme …

… is described …

… is analysed …

Emphasised are …

… is explained and illustrated with examples …

 

To conclude

In summary, …

To review, …

In conclusion, …

In brief, …

To summarise, …

To sum up, …

To conclude, …

Thus, …

Hence, …

It has been shown that, …

In short, …

 

To compare and contrast

Similarly, …

In the same way …

Likewise, …

In comparison …

Complementary to this …

Then again, …

However, …

This is in contrast to …

In contrast, …

And yet …

Nevertheless, …

Conversely, …

On the contrary, …

On the other hand, …

Notwithstanding …

Whereas …

In contrast to …

That aside, ...

While this is the case …

... disputes …

Despite this, ...

To add ideas

Also, …

Equally important ...

Subsequently, …

Futhermore, …

Moreover, …

As well as ....

Next…

Another essential point…

Additionally, ...

More importantly, …

In the same way …

Another ...

Then, …

In addition, …

Besides, ...

Then again, …

Firstly, ... secondly, ... thirdly, ... finally, ...

To elaborate, ...

To present uncommon or rare ideas

Seldom ...

Few ...

Not many ...

A few ...

... is uncommon

... is scarce ...

Rarely ...

... is rare ...

... is unusual ...

To present common or widespread ideas

Numerous ...

Many ...

More than ...

Several ...

Almost all ...

The majority ...

Most ...

Commonly ...

Significant ...

... is prevalent ...

... is usual ...

Usually ...

To present inconclusive ideas

Perhaps ...

... may be ...

... might be ...

There is limited evidence for ...

... is debated ...

... is possibly ...

... could ...

... may include ...

 

To give examples

For example, ...

... as can be seen in ...

... supports ...

An illustration of ...

... as demonstrated by ...

... is observed ...

Specifically, ...

... is shown ...

... exemplifies ...

Such as ...

As an example ...

To illustrate, ...

For instance, ...

 

 

To show relationships or outcome

Therefore ...

As a result ...

For that reason ...

Hence, ...

Otherwise, ...

Consequently, ...

The evidence suggests/shows ...

It can be seen that ...

With regard to ...

After examining ....

These factors contribute to ...

It is apparent that ...

Considering ... it can be concluded that ...

Subsequently, ....

The effect is ...

The outcome is ...

The result ...

The correlation ...

The relationship ...

The link ...

The convergence ...

The connection ...

... interacts with ...

Both ....

... affects ...

Thus it is ...

... causes ...

... influences ...

... predicts ...

... leads to ...

... informs ...

... presupposes

... emphasises

... demonstrates ...

... impacts on ...

... supports ...

To present prior or background ideas

In the past, ...

Historically, ...

Traditionally, ...

Customarily, ...

Beforehand, ...

Originally, ...

Prior to this, ...

Earlier, ...

Formerly, ...

Previously, ...

Over time, ...

At the time of ...

Conventionally, ...

Foundational to this is ...

In earlier ...

Initially, ...

At first, ...

Recently ...

Until now, ...

The traditional interpretation ...

 

To present others' ideas

According to …

Based on the findings of ... it can be argued...

… proposed that …

As explained by …

… states that …

… claims that …

However, ... stated that …

... suggested …

… concluded that …

Similarly, … stated that ….

… for example, …

… agreed that …

Based on the ideas of …

… defined …. as ….

… relates …

As identified by …

… disputed that …

… contrasts …

With regard to … argued that …

… concluded that …

… confirmed that …

... argues ….

… highlights …

… demonstrates …

… found that …

… identifies …

... wrote that …

… demonstrated …

… also …

… reported ….

… pointed out that …

… maintained that …

… hypothesised that …

… expressed the opinion that …

... also mentioned ….

... asserts that ….

… identified …

… goes on to state/suggest/say

… emphasises

… challenges the idea ….

… showed that …

… explored the idea …

 

Adapted from the following source

Manalo. E., Wont_Toi, G., & Bartlett-Trafford, J. (2009). The business of writing: Written communication skills for business students (3rd ed.). Auckland: Pearson Education New Zealand.

 

Updated August 22, 2012

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